Archive for the ‘visualization’ Category

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Live Charting Lyrics with “Hey Jude”

December 6, 2010

LucidChart.com gives a clever example of “live charting”: the process of diagramming a flow chart in time.   The given example diagrams the lyrics from “Hey Jude”.  It’s clearly a commercial, but it’s still a nice little demo.   It’s unclear if the author is the same person who did the original static diagram, I couldn’t find the original version online, only the linked page referencing it.  It’s interesting how the lyrics to certain pop songs can often be described so succinctly.

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Grand Taxonomy of Rap Names

November 5, 2010

Grand Taxonomy of Rap Names

Pop Chart Lab gives a great taxonomy of rap performer names [higher res version].  While honorific titles such as Lady Sovereign, or Sir Mix-a-lot are unsurprisingly common, it’s interesting to see such proliferation of gustatorial references, cartoon characters, and for lack of a better label “guys named Rob”.

If you’re looking for more like this, check out the taxonomy of heavy metal band names archived at Duke Listens!.

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Metasyn – Interactive Information Visualizer

April 5, 2010

Metasyn is an interface that allows visitors to explore the collection of contemporary art in Roskiilde.  The visualization includes an interactive 3D browser that is among the best I’ve seen.  Items are organized in the space  as follows:

The objects are lined up vertically by year showing the distribution of objects over time. For a given object, its vertical order is a product of the ‘grade of dominance’ that the related artist has. The objects that are made by artists whose objects are commonly accruing in the collection are placed closer to the ground plane. This results in an organisation where the most dominant artists are represented close to ‘the core’ of the structure, while the less known artists ends up in the periphery. This decision was made to support the impression of exploring the unknown in the outer areas of the collection, and to increase chances additionally that the museum’s choice of popular artists are promoted.

For the patient, be sure to check out the hi-res version of the video

Created by: Cark Emil Carlsen
Project site: Metasyn

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Ward Shelley : Visualizing Frank Zappa and Rock Genres

March 4, 2010

Frank Zappa Visualization

Ward Shelly shares with us a wonderful hand painted rendition of the life and music of Frank Zappa.  From his bio page:

Ward Shelley works as an artist in Brooklyn, New York. He specializes in large projects that freely mix sculpture and performance. Utilizing eclectic influences and a variety of media, Shelley’s installations defy classification. Over the last five years, Shelley has concentrated on bizarre functioning architectural pieces in which he lives and works during the exhibition monitored with live surveillance video equipment.

Shelley also works on a series of diagramatic paintings, timelines of art-related subjects such as the careers of artists working in de-materialized media and the history of art scenes. The best known of these is the Williamsburg Timeline Drawing and Downtown Body, recently published in Bomb Magazine.

He also has a great infographic of various rock genres:

In fact, he has a number of wonderfully realized visualizations covering various art figures and movements from Andy Warhol to Avant Garde.  You can access and view the entire list from this page.

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Charting the Beatles

February 25, 2010

Charting the Beatles is the brain child of Michael Deal, a New York based graphic artist.   In his words:

These visualizations are part of an extensive study of the music of the Beatles. Many of the diagrams and charts are based on secondary sources, including but not limited to sales statistics, biographies, recording session notes, sheet music, and raw audio readings

Eventually, Michael intends to produce a book of these charts, and has a placeholder website that should have more details once they’re available.

There’s also an extensive collection of pictures available on his Flickr group.

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Sync Lost

February 19, 2010

The popularization of electronic instruments and computers, allied to the broad and easy reachable information through the internet, enabled the appearance of countless rhythmic structures, giving rise to new styles and sub styles within contemporary electronic music.

Created in Processing, SyncLost is a multi-user immersive installation on the history of electronic music. The project’s objective is to create an interface where users can view all the connections between the main styles of electronic music through visual and audible feedback.

When you click on a particular node, all connections are shown – where the style comes from and which had been influenced by it – furthermore the music plays and a representative textual information is displayed. The visual feedback is given in real time, according to the user’s choice. The music rhythm serves as a visualization parameter of the style’s icon, creating multiple sonorous visualizations. You control the visualization through wiimote controls, while audible feedback is given through wireless headphones.

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Decoding the “EROICA”

December 17, 2009

The graph above plots tempi in the first movement, in terms of average beats per minute; the fastest is Hermann Scherchen, at 174.58, and the slowest is Otto Klemperer, in 1970, at 110.74.

Read more: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/alexross

(Thanks for the tip, Adam)